The Radical Imaginary: The Social Contract

Milo Rau, The Congo Tribunal, cinema documentary, still, 2017, 100 min. A Fruitmarket and Langfilm production, in coproduction with IIPM – International Institute of Political Murder, SRF Schweizer Radio und Fernsehen – SRG SSR / ZDF, in collaboration with ARTE. Distributed by Real Fiction and Vinca Film.

Milo Rau, The Congo Tribunal, cinema documentary, still, 2017, 100 min. A Fruitmarket and Langfilm production, in coproduction with IIPM – International Institute of Political Murder, SRF Schweizer Radio und Fernsehen – SRG SSR / ZDF, in collaboration with ARTE. Distributed by Real Fiction and Vinca Film.

John Boyle-Singfield, Reconstitution, still, 2015, vidéo, 90 min. Courtesy of the artist.

John Boyle-Singfield, excerpt from Terms of Service, 2013, 64 pages. Melodies composed by Gentiane M.-Gagnon. Courtesy of the artist.

Jill Magid, The Proposal: The Exhumation, still, 2016, video HD, 6 min 7 s. View of the exhibition Unsettlement, Monash University Museum of Art (MUMA, Australia), from April 28 to July 7, 2018.

Credit: Andrew Curtis.

Jill Magid, Tracing Albers’ Chair, still, 2014, video, 4 min 58 s. View of the exhibition Homage, RaebervonStenglin (Zürich), from April 26 to July 6, 2014.

Credit: Gunnar Meier.
2018.09.13 - 12.15

Milo Rau, John Boyle-Singfield, Jill Magid and more to come...*

Curator
Marie J. Jean

Opening on September 13, 2018 at 5:00 pm

*Participating artists will be progressively revealed on VOX’s web platforms during the summer… Stay tuned!

The Radical Imaginary: The Social Contract is the first project in a series of exhibitions about the Institution and its history, seeking to understand how artists have either associated themselves with or been opposed to it, gradually inflecting its positions. The objective is to observe an alternative form of institutional criticism that conceives of the judicial system, the university or the economy as processual forms, in constant transformation.

The judicial system is the institution studied in this initial component. The artworks presented call into question legal tools and concepts—rules, procedures, contracts, jurisprudence, trials—so as to understand how they act upon art, its system and its players, while altering the rules of the social game. The artists not only appropriate the apparatus of the legal system, exposing its ethical and political dimension, they also study the unseen codes governing it: for example, issues around intellectual property, which are inexorably transforming their work and the institutions in which they have agency.